Category: Planning

the one constant.

Change is the one constant we can count on. Whether revolutionary or evolutionary, the dynamic of progress leads to transition. It sometimes seems that these transitions are often the hardest aspects of business to comprehend and resolve. As a wise

resolution v. resolve.

It’s that time of year when we look back and find those aspects of our personal and professional lives that we know we could change—should change—to enable improved outcomes in our life and our work. And like most, developing a

the architecture of image.

I am happy to announce that my new book, The Architecture of Image: Branding Your Professional Service is now available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Bookwire. The book will also be available at the bookstore at SMPS’ Build Business

everything changes… get used to it.

Welcome to my first blog posting of 2013. In the past I’ve written about patience and impermanence, but thought it was timely to revisit Buddha, the marketing strategist. One of the basic precepts of Buddhism teaches that impermanence is reality.

fundamental foundational focus.

As we start a new year, I’ve found myself going back to the fundamental business development processes that I learned from early mentors. 1) Know your market. Expertise, experience and proven excellence define your niche (and be happy for that).

the six phases of the creative act.

Creativity is the life blood of the marketing effort. Without skillful ideation, every firm would look like every other firm—the death knell of a brand. Over the years, I’ve written and spoken about the six phases of a project, both

collaborative intelligence.

Each year, the Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) stages a major event, their Build Business conference. This building industry-focused conference, features speakers covering topics of advanced marketing and business development techniques, market-sector focused panels, and keynotes from noted thought

balancing act.

The role of the professional service firm is to provide advisory knowledge to benefit a client’s interests or issues. The challenge each firm faces is balancing their efforts between multiple clients—needed to maintain and grow the practice—and to serve them

to go or not to go.

That is the question. However, in these days of limited opportunities, the answer always seems to be “go!” Should it be? That’s the real question. Competition for professional services, even in good times, is defined by the functions of expertise,

front row on a roller coaster.

One of the marketing challenges of small (and many large) professional service practices is to not fall into the comfort of the “next big win.” Back in the day, having charted my own 25-person firm’s monthly ‘new business’ and I

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